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The Talkbox FAQ


IX. Discography

Click a link below for song information, including online audio clips. This list is arranged alphabetically by artist.

  1. "Sweet Emotion" and "Walk This Way" from Aerosmith's Toys In the Attic
    Joe Perry's talkbox work is featured in the beginning of Sweet Emotion, and in fills throughout.
    Perry's talkbox is also used while playing chords during the chorus on Walk This Way.


  2. "Man In The Box" from Alice in Chains' Facelift
    Talkbox is prominently featured during the opening riff and throughout song.


  3. "She's A Woman" from Jeff Beck's Blow by Blow
    Talkbox used as response to instrumental lead lines. A great instrumental guitar album!


  4. "It's My Life" from Bon Jovi's Crush
    Richie Sambora's talkbox work is a great example of what can be done with this device. A live version of this song was featured on VH1's Storytellers, where Richie had a mic for talkbox (with tube attached to the stand, protruding approx. 2" form the mic) and a second mic and stand for his backing vocals.


  5. "Livin' On A Prayer" from Bon Jovi's (New Jersey)
    Sambora introduced the talkbox to a whole new generation of rock fans, using it to build the main riff for the song, as well as in some of the leads.


  6. "Those Shoes" from The Eagles' (The Long Run)
    It sounds like the talkbox is saying "butt out, butt out." But whatever it's saying, it's prominently featured throughout the song. A nice example of multiple lead guitar work (as is all their work since Joe Walsh joined the group).


  7. "Generator" from Foo Fighters' There Is Nothing Left To Lose
    You can hear Dave Grohl's guitar talkbox track mixed slightly under the main guitar melody line. Grohl, former drummer for Nirvana, demonstrates some great guitar sounds in this band.


  8. "Do You Feel Like We Do?"
    and
    "Show Me The Way" from Peter Frampton's Frampton Comes Alive!

    Frampton probably sold more talkboxes during the 1970's than any other artist. His talkbox solo in Do You Feel Like We Do became an instant classic, while the talkbox introduction to Show Me The Way made it an FM radio staple in its day. This double album belongs in the library of every talkbox afficianado. Frampton now markets his own talkbox, the Framptone.


  9. "Kickstart My Heart" from Motley Crue's Dr. Feelgood
    Metal master Mick Mars features the talkbox in this rocker. (Recommendation by Max from Italy)


  10. "Hair of the Dog" from Nazareth's Hair of the Dog
    After the last chorus, you hear the talkbox repeating "bap-bap-bap-bap". This song always scores well in Top 1000 all-time rock lists.
    P.S. A lot of people think the song title is "Now You're Messing With A Son of a Bitch," since that's the chorus line of the tune. Now you know better.


  11. "Keep Talking" from Pink Floyd's The Division Bell
    Listen to David Gilmour's talkbox mastery at the end of the song. Like many guitarists, Gilmour runs a distorted signal into the talkbox for a more flowing lead sound. (Recommendation by Max from Italy)


  12. "Tell Me Something Good" from Rufus' Rags to Rufus
    The talkbox is used as a classic talking guitar here, apparently saying "tell me, tell me" during the chorus of this R&B tune. Since a wah pedal is also used in this tune, many people believe it is a wah that creates the talking effect. This song is also on the Very Best of Rufus album. Classic rockers, this tune is a nice change of pace to add to your repertoire -- especially if you have a female singer that can sing like Chakka Khan.


  13. "The Zoo" from Scorpions' Animal Magnetism
    A great arena rock band, The Scorpions bring down the house whenever this song is played. Matthias Jabs' talkbox solo is very prominent on this cut, also featured on the band's greatest hits compilation Best of Rockers 'N' Ballads.


  14. "Haitian Divorce" from Steely Dan's The Royal Scam
    A great talkbox tone is heard on lead fills throughout the song. This is an excellent example of how the larynx helps to define the sound. This song is also available on the compilation albums Very Best of: Reelin' in the Years, The Best of Steely Dan: Then and Now, and Citizen Steely Dan-1972-1980.


  15. "Mind Bender" from Stillwater's Hotels, Motels and Road Shows
    Hard to find, but worth the hunt. Originally on the 1977 Capricorn Records release Stillwater, this is a southern rock tune with a classic talking guitar sound. It was rereleased on CD in the late 1980s from Polydor/Japan (P2OP 22031). A live version appears on the 1997 White Clay Records/PolyGram WC 0715 release Alive Down South.


  16. "Funky Bounce"
    and
    "Dance Floor" from Zapp's, Zapp (featuring Roger Troutman)

    Numerous readers of The FAQ have written to recommend Troutman's singing guitar for inclusion here. I agree.


  17. "Pigs (Three Different Ones)" from Pink Floyd's Animals
    Talkbox solo begins approximately 5:20 into the song. You'll also hear it throughout the song for background sound FX.


  18. "Rocky Mountain Way" from Joe Walsh's The Smoker You Drink, The Player You Get
    This is arguably one of the best-known recorded examples of a talkbox. Walsh's talkbox guitar sometimes sings and sometimes solos. A great work. This song is also on the compilation CDs The Best Of Joe Walsh, The Best of Joes Walsh: Little Did He Know..., Look What I Did, and Rocky Mountain Way.


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